ERCcOMICS Blog


"Roots of Hatha Yoga" Reading in Milan

Some pictures of our reading of the "Roots of Hatha Yoga" webcomic in Milan, on September the 8th, during a Yoga Studies workshop organised by the Ca' Foscari University.

With : James Mallinson, Mark Singleton, Jason Birch and Daniela Bevilacqua (Hatha Yoga project at SOAS University, London), Piero Macola (comic artist) and Massimo Colella (ERCcOMICS team)

 

published on 15/09/2018

OUR FINAL CALL!

ERCcOMICS, coordinated by Sorbonne Université in partnership with La Bande Destinée, a French communication agency, is the result of an ERC call for proposals aiming to find “innovative ways to highlight ERC projects”.

The goal of ERCcOMICS is to create webcomics about the subjects and results of several scientific projects funded by the European Research Council (ERC).

Each webcomic will be the result of a close cooperation between the researcher, the ERCcOMICS team and a comic artist. Depending on the subject, the webcomic could be a fictional or documentary story of any genre: science fiction, historical, thriller, autobiographical. Each webcomic, before publication, will always have the grantee’s final validation.

If you are a comic artist interested in science and you are willing to participate in this adventure fill this form by September 30th, 2018

More details and remuneration will be communicated by email.

The ERCcOMICS Team

published on 12/09/2018

#ResearchPortraits 21

Jerusalem Antoine ERC

ANSWER: Because it provides new avenues to understand better brain injuries, Alzheimer's disease and many other brain conditions.

The development of a multiphysics neuron model which Antoine Jerusalem from Oxford University is exploring is at the heart of tremendous medical challenges regarding severe brain conditions like Alzheimer's disease and brain injuries.

The modelling of neurons led by Prof. Jerusalem aims at exploring how mechanical, electrophysiological and chemical mechanisms interact in neurons. Such interaction is at the hearth of the understanding that can lead to drastic advancements in medicine.

The multiphysics neuron model will ultimately allow the bio-medical community to enhance their knowledge on neuron deformation, growth, electrosignalling and thus, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer or brain injuries, and even ultrasound neuromodulation.

published on 04/09/2018

#ResearchPortraits 20

Penny Lewis ERCcOMICS

 

ANSWER: YES!  

Everybody would like to become more creative. And yes, sleep (and science!) can help.

We know that creative thinking and problem solving often require suppression of preconceptions and restructuring of existing knowledge. In other words, creativity integrates new ways of thinking with older knowledge. Such an integration is thought to be facilitated by sleep. Specifically Slow Wave Sleep (SWS), that has been shown to help us pull general rules out of sets of related information. Also, Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep is thought to be important for making inferences and improbably connections.

SleepSolution an ERC project led by Penny Lewis (Cardiff University) is investigating how we can manipulate sleep to uncover how REM and SWS sleep promote both long-term memory and creative problem solving.  The project is doing this by triggering memory replay in REM and SWS and looking at how this impacts on problem solving.

Dr Lewis will also will develop methods for boosting key sleep processes in a selective, targeted manner, to facilitate everyday problem solving.

Look how Penny Lewis talks about improving your life by manipulating your sleep:

 

published on 29/08/2018

#ResearchPortraits 19

The ability to understand and predict others’ behaviour is crucial in daily life. From driving a car on a busy street to playing a team game such as football, we constantly need to be able to anticipate what other people will do. When predicting and explaining behaviors of other humans, we often refer to their mental states, such as beliefs, desires and intentions. This is what philosophers call adopting the “intentional stance”. The question of interest is whether (and under which conditions) would we adopt the intentional stance towards robots. Would we attribute intentions to their behavior, if the behavior appears very human-like? It might be that once a robot imitates human-like behaviour at the level of subtle (and often implicit) social signals, humans might automatically perceive its behaviour as reflecting mental states. This will presumably also facilitate treating the robot as a social companion. Adopting the intentional stance towards robots might make the human-robot dyad more socially attuned, thereby making the interaction more natural and intuitive.

To learn more about Agnieszka Wykowska’s research visit her website 

 

published on 14/08/2018

#ResearchPortraits 18

A novel theory of the big bang as a hologram opens up the way for a whole new vision of the universe.
Prof Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven and the late Professor Stephen Hawking from Cambridge University put forward a new theory of the big bang. The paper, Hawking’s last and published in the Journal of High Energy Physics, is entitled `A Smooth Exit from Eternal Inflation?’. Hawking and Hertog view the big bang as a hologram. They argue this gives them a grip on the multiverse that is widely thought to come out of the big bang. Their new theory constrains the multiverse. It predicts our universe is finite and roughly the same everywhere. Professor Hertog’s work has been supported by the European Research Council.

For more information, you can read this interview

and watch this video:

published on 07/08/2018

#ResearchPortraits 17

Giselinde Kuipers ERC

The ERC grantee Giselinde Kuipers studies how beauty standards – perceptions of physical beauty in women and men – are socially shaped. Her starting point was the transnational fashion and modelling industry. It is unique in human history that we have an institution like this: completely devoted to the creation and dissemination of (images of) human beauty. However, and surprisingly, the research showed that the beauty standards of ordinary Europeans – with the exception of a small minority - generally do not resemble the standards of this industry.

While people have strong feelings and opinions about beauty, at the same time there are great variations in what they find beautiful. Usually this is not the thin, pale ideal of the modelling industry. Giselinde Kuipers’ research showed that beauty standards are group-specific: they mark groups differences both within across and within cultures, leading to social inclusion and exclusion. Thus, while beauty may seem frivolous, it has important social consequences. These consequences become increasingly visible in today’s media-saturated, service-based societies where “looking good” has become the norm for everyone from shop attendant to college professor.

Learn more in this TEDx talk: 

 

published on 31/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 16

Hans Verbeeck ERC ERCcOMICS

Tropical forests play an essential role in the global carbon cycle - a well-known fact. Something that not many people know, however, is that lianas are key components of these forests, and furthermore, they have been increasing in abundance and biomass over the last two decades, but nobody knows why. Therefore, the ERC council awarded Prof. Hans Verbeeck a grant to discover the reason why. Liana proliferation might be a key adaptation mechanism of tropical forests to climate change, with large impacts on the long term tropical forest carbon balance, and until now no single terrestrial ecosystem model currently includes lianas!

published on 24/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 15

Mickael Tanter ERC
Answer: SOON! 

Panayiota Poirazi uses computational models of the brain to understand how memories are formed and what mechanisms help us recall these memories in fast and reliable manners. A typical example that nearly everyone has experienced is misplacing our keys. The following talk highlights the neural and dendritic mechanisms used by the brain to create associations in order to optimize recall and ultimately reveal the location of the lost keys.

For more information, check out her TEDx talk: 

And the website of her lab:

http://www.dendrites.gr/en/

published on 20/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 14

Mickael Tanter ERC
Answer: SOON! 

The leading physicist Prof. Tanter and his interdisciplinary team at the Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI Paris) are precisely developing a revolutionary high-resolution, high-speed, safe and portable ultrasound technology for neuroimaging, with the support of the European Research Council (ERC).
This technique, based on ultrasound technology, can reveal the functional connectivity of the brain and has already captured full sequences never observed before, such as epilepsy seizure propagation.
Contrary to the fMRI, the functional ultrasound is light, portable, cheap, can be used during surgery, thus offering tremendous clinical applications and new paths for fundamental research.

For more information: www.fultrasound.eu

published on 13/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 13

Ulf Leonhardt ERC

ANSWER: Yes, with geometry, light, and a wee bit of magic - also known as science!

The research subject of Ulf Leonhardt, who explores the physics of space-time curvature by connecting geometry and optics. This kind of research may seem remote from everyday life but it governs the optics of magnifying glasses, or the displacement of objects in water, or optical illusions like a mirage or the ultimate illusion - invisibility. The best way to describe the connection between geometry and light is to think of fish in an aquarium, like in the painting Les poissons rouges by Matisse. We see the fish in places other than where they actually are, because the water has distorted the images. Our perception of space is then altered by the water, as our perception is created by the way in which light perceives the altered space. 

For light in materials - like water or glass - space appears to be curved. How to understand this connection between geometry and light, and how to apply it is subject of Leonhardt's research. 

To see how science can make things disappear, watch: 

 

published on 10/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 12

Nello Cristianini ERC

ANSWER: No

There is no such thing as general intelligence, and humans are not the destination of evolution. Our type of intelligence makes sense for this specific social ape, and its mind reading and communication needs. Other forms of intelligence existed well before the first human. I do not see why machine intelligence should be closer to us than - say - to a shark. Note that machines do not need to think like us, in order to outwit us. This technology already exists.

For more information about the research of ERC grantee Nello Cristianini, check out: 

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/engineering/people/nello-cristianini/overview.html

 

published on 06/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 11

Emily Cross ERC
ANSWER: Yes and No 

In a society in which robots are becoming ever more ubiquitous in a variety of home, workplace, and social settings, it is important to understand how we interact with them. Emily S. Cross at University of Glasgow, within the framework of her SOCIAL ROBOTS ERC Project, is researching several facets of how people perceive and interact with robots in social settings.
By combining neuroscience, psychology and robotics, Prof. Cross and her team are exploring when and how robots are seen as social agents (as opposed to simply machines or tools), how long-term experience or interactions with robots change our impressions of them.

The particularly exciting central aim of the SOCIAL ROBOTS project is to determine whether brain regions implicated in social cognition when we interact with humans can also be engaged when we interact with robots. Prof. Cross and her team are investigating this fundamental question across a range of different populations, ranging from young children to older adults, and across eastern and western cultures.  

For more information: 

http://www.so-bots.com/

published on 03/07/2018

#ResearchPortraits 10

Burgard ERC

ANSWER: YES!

Wolfram Burgard develops intelligent, autonomous systems: in other words, self-driving robots. His scientific vision, further developed thanks to the ERC project LifeNav, is that autonomous systems can learn to move and navigate without maps thanks to deep learning. 

This means that the robot is learns to translate the data that it receives from its sensors directly into action, and the more it does it, the better it becomes at doing it. Specifically, the goal of the LifeNav project is to design mobile robot systems that can reliably operate over extended periods of time in complex and dynamically changing environments. 

For more information:  

http://lifenav.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/

published on 29/06/2018

#questionsofscience 5

ANSWER: If we manage Europe’s forests  properly they could provide many valuable goods and services but their capacity to cool the climate turns out to be limited. 

Forests remove atmospheric CO2 which is one of the greenhouse gases that increase global warming, and as such cool the planet when they absorb CO2 during photosynthesis to produce leaves, branches, wood and roots. 

But this is only one of the ways in which forests interact with the climate. For example, because of their darkness, forests tend to absorb heat and they also have an impact on the climate through the transpiration of water by tree leaves and subsequent cloud formation.

Forest management has become a priority in politics as globally 70% of forests are managed or exploited by man. Forest management is currently optimised in terms of wood production but rarely considers the effects of albedo and transpiration on the climate system. 

Dr. Sebastiaan Luyssaert and his team are using advanced models and extensive data from monitoring networks to quantify the effects of Europe’s managed forests on the climate system. This will allow a new approach to forest management that would satisfy the societal demand for wood, recreation and nature while contributing to lessen the impact of global warming.

 

For more information, here’s an article on Science:

http://science.sciencemag.org.vu-nl.idm.oclc.org/content/351/6273/597

published on 28/06/2018


#ResearchPortraits 8

Malin Parmar ERC
ANSWER: Yes

Malin Parmar can make new neurons from your skin or other cells. At Lund University, Sweden, she focuses on bringing new cell-based therapies to the clinic. Her work in cell reprogramming opens up new revolutionary possibilities of personalised treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson.

For more information, you can watch this interview: 

published on 22/06/2018

#ResearchPortraits 7


Francois Pachet ERC

ANSWER: Yes!
Thanks to the ERC-funded project Flow Machines, François Pachet developed a technology for style imitation under user constraints.
This research led to the release of "Hello World", the first music album composed with artificial intelligence. "Hello World" is the result of the collaboration between AI, Benoit Carré aka SKYGGE and a selection of other musicians. You can listen to it here.

For more information: 

www.flow-machines.com

published on 19/06/2018

#ResearchPortraits 6

This is the object of the comparative study by Prof. Vanessa Grotti, EU Border Care.
Since 2011, because of regional upheavals and conflicts which have thrown many families and young women out of their homes and on increasingly dangerous migration journeys, there has been an increase of pregnant refugees who enter Europe through its external borders, especially along the southern and southeastern European borders. The most commmon scenarios researchers for the EU Border Care project have encountered and studied are refugee mothers who have fled conflict with their families and young women who have either been separated from their families or trafficked along the migration trail. Access to safe contraception (currently not available) is a major problem across the migration trails worldwide, and the routes into the EU represent no exception. Safety and protection on the migration trails and in refugee camps are also major problems EU Border Care has identified. Pregnant mothers, regardless of their nationality or legal status, are legally classified as vulnerable in the southern European countries EU Border Care studies, and will be offered some degree of assistance and medical care in state-funded clinics and hospitals.

For more information:

http://eubordercare.eu/

published on 15/06/2018

#ResearchPortraits 5

Leclercq ERC

ANSWER: yes

A key characteristic of dynamic transportation networks is the classical antagonism between user and system benefits. The integration of best choices for users does not necessarily lead to optimal conditions at the network level. Classical management strategies are usually applied at local scale by controlling flows, e.g. traffic signal management.
Within the MAGnUM ERC project that started in 2015, we are exploring new approaches that focus on trips at the whole city scale including all multimodal options.
We are convinced that this will contribute to rethink the daily management of mobility in smart cities.

For more information:

https://magnum-erc.weebly.com

published on 12/06/2018

#ResearchPortraits 4

Matteo Ballottari ERC

ANSWER: Yes, but... 

We can use sunlight, the most abundant renewable energy available for our Planet. But to do this, we must improve photosynthetic efficiency. Matteo Ballottari, together with the interdisciplinary SOLE Lab, studies precisely how to "exploit" sunlight at its best to consume CO2 producing biomass. In the framework of the ERC-funded project SOLENALGAE, he focuses on improving photosynthetic efficiency by microalgae. The use of microalgae, or microscopic algae, has many advantages: indeed, they are not in competition with food production and their exploitation is completely sustainable. Today, the main limitation encountered for sustained biomass production by microalgae is just low light use efficiency compared to their potential, but SOLENALGAE will change that! 

For  more  information visit:  
www.solelab.org

published on 07/06/2018

#ResearchPortraits 3

 

Answer: This is what ERC grantee Manuel Franco will find out!

His Heart Healthy Hoods team is measuring the food, physical activity, alcohol and tobacco environments of hundreds of neighbourhoods in Madrid, a city with similar historical and demographic profile as many other European cities. They will correlate these urban environment results with cardiovascular primary care health records of 1,5 million adults living in Madrid and a cohort of over 2500 participants.

For more information please visit: 
https://hhhproject.eu/

published on 05/06/2018

#ResearchPortraits 2

Markos Papageorgiou ERC

Answer: YES

...but not by themselves. Recent advances render vehicles intelligent enough to navigate safely in a world of manually driven vehicles; but intelligent vehicles may lead to dump traffic flow if not managed appropriately.
In his ERC project TRAMAN21, Prof. Markos Papageorgiou and his team have developed and tested various traffic management concepts, algorithms and actions that enable the future increasing populations of automated vehicle to behave in a way that maximizes the emerging traffic flow efficiency, and hence minimises highway congestion.

For more information:
http://www.traman21.tuc.gr/

published on 01/06/2018


#ResearchPortraits 1

Mathieu Vinken ERC
Answer: YES

Mathieu Vinken from VUB (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) discovered that suppression of a specific type of biochemical communication among liver cells is a very promising way for treating liver disease.
Find out more here

published on 29/05/2018

#questionsofscience 3

Answer : NO

In the beauty industry, especially in high fashion, beauty is not the opposite of ugliness. Instead, the beauty standards of high fashion play a complicated game with the more conventional standards of popular and mainstream fashion. They negate the ‘pretty’ aesthetics of mainstream magazines and advertising, where models do look more like the evolutionary ideal: young, health, smiling, radiant. They also negate the ‘sexy’ aesthetics of commercial magazines like Cosmopolitan and Men’s Health: provocative, sexualized, exaggeratedly feminine or masculine.
In effect, high fashion has followed a similar trajectory as art has followed in the 20th century: away from beauty that is directly understandable to everyone, continuous with everyday life, towards a form of beauty that negates everyday beauty, or even negates the idea of beauty itself.
High fashion’s idea of beauty is a constant exploration for something that is different: different from conventional ideas of beauty, different from other magazines, different even from what they themselves hailed as the new beauty standard only a year ago. In this search for aesthetic distinction, high fashion beauty has become increasingly distinct from what our inner ape desires. But for those in the know, the effect is aesthetically pleasing, in highly specific ways. It is the beauty of the unexpected.

Prof. Giselinde Kuipers. Chair, Sociology Department, University of Amsterdam
https://erccomics.com/comics/the-sociology-of-beauty

 

published on 24/05/2018

#questionsofscience 2

Answer : YES
In the near future it could be possible to produce a portable brain scanner for monitoring brain activity in human adults through the skull bone and provide a neuro-bio feedback to allow people to control their own pain or their emotions with a non invasive device. This could be possible thanks to the ERC research project fUSimagine that is introducing a breakthrough full fledged neuroimaging modality based on ultrasound. The Fusimagine team at Langevin Institute is providing evidence that functional Ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound by analogy to fMRI) could have a major impact in neuroscience from fundamental research to clinical applications. The group believes their new machine will very soon become standard equipment for bedside monitoring of infants with brain disorders and will provide a new tool for researchers looking to understand the root causes of brain disorders and to ultimately prevent them from developing.
Mickaël Tanter - Research Professor Inserm
https://erccomics.com/comics/brain-trippers

published on 17/05/2018

#questionsofscience 1

Answer : YES
« In order to see, eyes need to turn light into nerve signals, and for this the light needs to be absorbed in the first place. And eyes couldn’t absorb light if they were invisible! All this is, because everything we see is carried by light. Light contains all the images of the world. People did not always know that, about a thousand years ago many thought seeing is sending out rays for capturing images, until the scholar Alhazen wrote the first book on empirical, fact-based science (The Book of Optics) in which he proved that seeing means capturing light. Seeing is retrieving. »
Prof. Ulf Leonhardt - Weizmann Institute of Science
https://erccomics.com/comics/invisible

published on 10/05/2018

EmojinScience

Project: Emoji is worth a thousand words!

To use Emojis to illustrate complexity, and discourse science together. The challenge is to use a “simple” language, to describe intricate concepts.

Reasons: Emojis are popular and universal

We want to use Emojis because of their ambivalence.
A symbol can be read in a very personal way, and at the same time, anyone who uses a symbol can also be deeply misunderstood. But symbols can also disambiguate a sentence, adding emotions or context.
Writing with a fresh, simple grammar that focuses more on concepts, this approach with emojis is essentially new, in particular for people from the west.
In addition to that, they're fun, colourful and most importantly “universal”, they can just as well theoretically be understood in France, Japan, the Congo and Mexico, all at the same time.

Goal: Emoji are for everyone, science can be too

The EmojinScience project aims to work in an educational way to boost this new visual communication tool to a higher cultural level. The objective is to change the paradigm that suggests that “hearts” and “smilies” cannot be used for scientific communication, and most of all to connect people and scientists worldwide.

Rules!



Translation

  • Basically, you can't write in any language with letters or ideograms.
  • Emojis, of course, are allowed. As many as possibles!
  • Numbers and punctuation are allowed
  • Hashtags are allowed
  • Account tagging is allowed
  • Links are allowed

published on 09/05/2018

Draw your ERC #3

ARE YOU AN ERC GRANTEE?

YOU COULD HAVE A WHOLE WEBCOMIC DEDICATED TO YOUR PROJECT!

ERCcOMICS, coordinated by Sorbonne Université in partnership with the French communication agency La Bande Destinée, is the result of an ERC call for proposals aiming to highlight projects and researchers funded by the ERC in novel ways, across Europe

ERCcOMICS is a creative and ambitious 4-year project which exploits the power of visual storytelling through webcomics to promote and explain the achievements of ERC funded projects and the benefits of the ERC funding scheme for technological and scientific development, as well as for society as a whole.

Each webcomic is the result of a close cooperation between the ERC grantee, the ERCcOMICS team and a comic artist. Depending on the subject, the webcomic could be a fictional or documentary story of any genre: science fiction, historical, thriller, autobiographical. Before publication, each webcomic will be validated by the researcher, so as to guarantee its scientific accuracy.

The webcomics will be widely disseminated through a great variety of communication tools and channels.

Following this expression of interest, three ERC projects will be selected and featured in webcomics of approx.50 pages each. These will be published in 10 chapters over a period of one year.

Additional ERC projects may be selected for shorter comics and illustrations that will be published on ERCcOMICS website and social networks. 

If you want to participate in this adventure, please take a moment to complete this form by MAY 31th, 2018.

We will communicate the selected projects in September 2018.

If you have any question or want to send more details please contact us at info@erccomics.com 

The ERCcOMICS Team

published on 02/05/2018

ERCcOMICS General Assembly 2017 @ UPMC - Paris

Some pictures from the ERCcOMICS General Assembly that took place at UPMC in Paris on the 4th of December 2017.

Many thanks to all the participants who contributed to a remarkably constructive and interesting discussion!

                           

Comics artist Lorenzo Palloni and the Nanocosmos ERC Principal Investigators José Ángel Martín-Gago, Christine Joblin and José Cernicharo

Comics artist Clayton Junior and the fUSimagine ERC Principal Investigator Mickaël Tanter

published on 05/12/2017

Illustrated Talk by Mickael Tanter

Watch the full illustrated talk (in french) by Mickael Tanter (research director at INSERM) about Ultrasound Neuroimaging, illustrated by Clayton Junior (comics artist of the webcomic BRAIN TRIPPERS) at the Fête de la Science in PARIS, Campus de Jussieu on Saturday 14 October 2017.

published on 04/12/2017

Illustrated Talk by Christine Joblin

Watch the full illustrated talk (in french) by Christine Joblin (research director at CNRS Toulouse) & comics artist Lorenzo Palloni at the Fête de la Science in PARIS, Campus de Jussieu, on the 14th of October 2017

published on 22/11/2017

The baby's brain as never seen before

For the first time ever, a team of scientists and clinicians led by the EU-funded researcher Mickael Tanter has managed to record the brain activity of a premature new-born baby during resting and during an epileptic seizure.

Read more on the ERC website

published on 20/10/2017

Drawings and ideas

Some pictures of the ideas from the collaborative drawings on our stand at the "Fête de la Science" at UPMC in Paris last weekend

published on 17/10/2017

Fête de la Science 2017

Some pictures from the 2nd edition of our illustrated talks with the artist Lorenzo Palloni and the researchers Christine Joblin (ERC Nanocosmos) and Mickael Tanter (ERC fUSimagine).

Pictures taken at the ERCcOMICS stand during the "Fête de la Science" at Jussieu Campus in Paris last weekend.

published on 16/10/2017


WE WANT YOU!

 

If you are a comic artist interested in science and you are willing to participate in this adventure fill this form by October 31th, 2017.

The ERCcOMICS Team

published on 03/10/2017


Expecting: the odyssey of pregnant migrant women in the Mediterranean

On the occasion of the approaching World Refugee Day, we present our new online graphic novel "Expecting".

Undocumented pregnant women are a growing phenomenon: yet, few social science or public health studies address this subject. As a result, the EU funded the project EU Border Care, a comparative study of maternity care among undocumented migrants.

Especially relevant to this issue, our webcomic tells about two parallel stories: Sham and Matina. Sham is a Syrian refugee travelling to Greece, who discovers to be pregnant, and Matina is a Greek midwife working in a volunteering center. 

The Principal Investigator of EU Border Care is Vanessa Grotti, who leads a team of researchers working on the field. Specifically, the researchers work in maternity wards located in French Guiana and Mayotte (Overseas France), the North Aegean and Attica (Greece), Sicily (Italy), and Ceuta and Melilla (Spain).

The artist working of the storyboard as well as the drawings for "Expecting" is Sandrine Martin. Sandrine published many graphic novels and illustrations, and you can find some of her works here

eubordercare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

published on 16/06/2017

Visiting the Stars - 2

Some pictures of our recent visit to the IRAP/ CNRS in Toulouse. Many thanks to Christine Joblin and her team for their explanations on the Nanocosmos project.

The meeting with the seniors of the Nanocosmos team

The ESPOIRS nanograin platform.

The PIRENEA platform.

The new PIRENEA 2 setup

Exploring the formation of cosmic grains in plasma reactors

The - AROMA : Analysis of the molecular content of dust analogues

published on 27/04/2017

Draw your ERC #2

ARE YOU AN ERC GRANTEE?

YOU COULD HAVE A WHOLE WEBCOMIC DEDICATED TO YOUR PROJECT!

ERCcOMICS, coordinated by Pierre and Marie Curie University-Paris 6 in partnership with La Bande Destinée, a French communication agency, is the result of an ERC call for proposals aiming to find “innovative way to highlight ERC projects”.

It is a creative and ambitious 4-year project which exploits the power of visual storytelling through webcomics to promote and explain the achievements of ERC funded projects and the benefits of the ERC funding scheme for technological and scientific development, as well as for society as a whole.

Each webcomic is the result of a close cooperation between the ERC grantee, the ERCcOMICS team and a comic artist. Depending on the subject, the webcomic could be a fictional or documentary story of any genre: science fiction, historical, thriller, autobiographical. Each webcomic, before publication, will always have the grantee’s final validation.
The webcomics will be widely disseminated through a great variety of communication tools and channels.

Each webcomic will be constituted of ca. 50 pages, which will be published in 10 chapters over a period of one year.

UPDATE : The application for «Draw your ERC» is closed. Many thanks to all participants!

We will communicate the selected projects in July 2017.

The ERCcOMICS Team

published on 03/04/2017



Visiting the Stars!

Some pictures of our recent visit to the Nanocosmos team at the "Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid" with comic artist Lorenzo Palloni.

published on 27/02/2017


How do we work #3

This is how we worked on the 5th episode of Beauty.

From the storyboard by Massimo Colella to the final page by Francesca Protopapa for the 1st part.

Storyboard and final page by Eleonora Antonioni for the 2nd part of the webcomic

published on 23/01/2017


illustrated talks "On beauty"

A speedy video of our illustrated talks "On Beauty" last October at Spui25 in Amsterdam. 
Live drawings by Francesca Protopapa & Eleonora Antonioni

The full video of the 4 illustrated talks : On Beauty
In cooperation with the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (University of Amsterdam) and the European Research Council.

published on 22/12/2016

How do we work #2

From the storyboard (by Massimo Colella) to the final page (by Fiammetta Ghedini).

This is how we worked on the 9th episode of Max Order that you can read here.

published on 29/11/2016


Treeclimbers

A presentation of the Treeclimbers project by Prof. Hans Verbeeck

published on 17/10/2016

On beauty: 2nd edition of the ERCcOMICS illustrated talks

Some pictures of our 2nd Illustrated talks that took place at SPUI25 in Amsterdam on October 11.

On beauty: How fashion creates beauty standards and vice versa. In cooperation with the Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences (University of Amsterdam) and the European Research Council.

---

Speakers : Sylvia Holla (M.A. Atria/University of Amsterdam), Dr. Elise van der Laan (Museum Boymans van Beuningen), Elise A.G. Arfini (University of Milan) and Prof. Dr. Giselinde Kuipers (University of Amsterdam)

Live drawing by Eleonora Antonioni and Francesca Protopapa, who are working on the Beauty webcomic.

Selfie of the ERCcOMICS Team in Amsterdam : Massimo, Marie, Eleonora, Fiammetta and Francesca.

Coming soon the video of the illustrated talks.

published on 12/10/2016

We want you!

ERCcOMICS, coordinated by Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6 in partnership with La Bande Destinée, a French communication agency, is the result of an ERC call for proposals aiming to find “innovative ways to highlight ERC projects”.

It is a creative and ambitious 4-year project that exploits the power of visual storytelling through webcomics to promote and explain the achievements of ERC funded projects and the benefits of the ERC funding scheme for technological and scientific development, as well as for society as a whole.

Each comic will be the result of a close cooperation between the researcher, the ERCcOMICS team and a comic artist. Depending on the subject, the webcomic could be a fictional or documentary story of any genre: science fiction, historical, thriller, autobiographical. Each webcomic, before publication, will always have the grantee’s final validation.

The 4 selected ERC projects for the second year will be dealing with cosmic dust, neuroscience, ultrasounds imaging and migratory flux through european borders.

Each webcomic will be constituted of ca. 50 pages, which will be published in 10 chapters over a period of one year.

If you are a comic artist interested in science and you are willing to participate in this adventure, send an email to info@erccomics.com by October 30th, 2016.

More details and remuneration will be communicated by email.

Send us: your portfolio and a few words of motivation.

The ERCcOMICS Team

published on 03/10/2016

How do we work #1

A preview of the Work In Progress on the next episode of "Beauty" that will be online on October 20.

Research by Prof. Giselinde Kuipers / Script by Massimo Colella / Drawings by Eleonora Antonioni & Francesca Protopapa

Step 1 : THE DISCUSSION with the researcher

Step 2 : THE SCRIPT

Step 3 : THE STORYBOARD

 

Step 4 : THE INKING

Final step : THE COLORS

published on 27/09/2016

The Illustrated Talks are online

Enjoy the Illustrated Talks which took place at UPMC on June 26, 2016, on our YouTube channel:
Composing a song with Flow Machines
by François Pachet (ERC grant "Flow Machines") and Fiammetta Ghedini (drawings)
 


Co-Adaptive Instruments: Can we reinvent the graphical user interface? 
Wendy Mackay (ERC grant "Creating Co-Adaptive Human-Computer Partnership") and Luigi Critone (drawings).


The Garden of Invisibility 
Ulf Leonhardt (ERC grant "Transformation Optics") and Thomas Gosselin (drawings) 


Modelling lianas as key drivers of tropical forest responses to climate change 
Hans Verbeek (ERC grant "Treeclimbers") and Giacomo Nanni (drawings)

published on 05/09/2016

Illustrated Talks Pictures

Some pictures from the first edition of the ERCcOMICS "Illustrated Talks" that took place in Paris at UPMC on June 29.

1st Illustrated Talk : Composing a song with Flow Machines
François Pachet (ERC grant "Flow Machines") and Fiammetta Ghedini

2nd illustrated Talk : The Garden of Invisibility
Ulf Leonhardt (ERC grant "Transformation Optics") and Thomas Gosselin

3d illustrated Talk : Co-Adaptive Instruments: Can we reinvent the graphical user interface?
Wendy Mackay (ERC grant "Creating Co-Adaptive Human-Computer Partnership") and Luigi Critone

4th illustrated Talk : Modelling lianas as key drivers of tropical forest responses to climate change
Hans Verbeek (ERC grant "Treeclimbers") and Giacomo Nanni

 

published on 12/07/2016

Presenting the ERC Illustrated Talks!

We are pleased & proud to present the first edition of the ERCcOMICS "Illustrated Talks".
The Illustrated talks feature four ERC grantees presenting their research vision, outputs and objectives, accompanied by an illustrator who will draw in real time, inspired by their speech. 

You will discover how artificial intelligence can help musicians to compose a song; why lianas are proliferating in the rainforest; how physics can make an object invisibile; and how graphic interfaces will evolve in the future.

The Illustrated Talks will take place at in Paris at UPMC, Jussieu Campus, on Wednesday June 29, Amphi 25, and they are open to the public, so join us!

Here's the program:

 

Wednesday 29 June

18:00-18:15: Introduction

18:15-18:30: Composing a song with Flow Machines
François Pachet (ERC grant "Flow Machines") and Fiammetta Ghedini

18:30-18:45: The Garden of Invisibility
Ulf Leonhardt (ERC grant "Transformation Optics") and Thomas Gosselin

18:45-19:00: Modelling lianas as key drivers of tropical forest responses to climate change
Hans Verbeek (ERC grant "Treeclimbers") and Giacomo Nanni

19:00-19:15: Co-Adaptive Instruments: Can we reinvent the graphical user interface?
Wendy Mackay (ERC grant "Creating Co-Adaptive Human-Computer Partnership") and Luigi Critone

If you wish to assist at this event enter your email. You will receive a free invitation a week before the event.

For any requests please write to info@erccomics.com.

Organised in collaboration with UPMC and ICCC16

published on 30/05/2016

Draw your ERC

ARE YOU AN ERC GRANTEE?

YOU COULD HAVE A WHOLE WEBCOMIC DEDICATED TO YOUR PROJECT

ERCcOMICS, coordinated by Université Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6 in partnership with La Bande Destinée, a French communication agency, is the result of an ERC call for proposals aiming to find “innovative ways to highlight ERC projects”.

It is a creative and ambitious 4-year project that exploits the power of visual storytelling through webcomics to promote and explain the achievements of ERC funded projects and the benefits of the ERC funding scheme for technological and scientific development, as well as for society as a whole. 

Each comic will be the result of a close cooperation between the ERC grantee, the ERCcOMICS team and a comic artist. Depending on the subject, the webcomic could be a fictional or documentary story of any genre: science fiction, historical, thriller, autobiographical. Each webcomic, before publication, will always have the grantee’s final validation. 

The webcomics will be widely disseminated, in several EU languages, and through a great variety of communication tools and channels. 

Each webcomic will be constituted of ca. 50 pages, which will be published in 10 chapters over a period of one year.

If you are willing to participate in this venture, send an email to info@erccomics.com with the following information, by April 30th, 2016.

UPDATE : The application for «Draw your ERC» is closed. Many thanks to all participants!

We will communicate the selected project on the 30 of June.

The ERCcOMICS Team

published on 28/03/2016

Welcome to the ERCcOMICS blog

In this blog we will keep you updated with all the news concerning the project. 

You will find articles, pictures, videos and… comics, of course!

Let’s start with a picture of the kick off meeting of ERCcOMICS that took place at the UPMC in Paris in December 2015.

published on 07/03/2016